Helicopter Spreads 40,000 Pounds of Seed

MIDDLEBURY — Addison County farmers have seen a rainy and consistently wet spring and summer result in a late corn harvest. Now some of those farmers are looking to the skies again — this time for help in planting a cover crop this fall. This past Tuesday and Wednesday a crop-dusting helicopter dropped nearly 40,000

Aerial Seeding: Local Aviation and Agriculture Experts Allay Fears of Mid-Shore Citizens

EASTON — If you see a low-flying small plane dipping below the treeline, swooping low over fields and looping back up sharply to do it again — don’t panic. It’s simply aerial agriculture. Small planes applying cover crops by air during late summer are nothing new to longtime residents of Talbot County, but for the

EPA, U.S. Army Repeal 2015 Rule Defining “Waters of the United States” Ending Regulatory Patchwork

WASHINGTON (September 12, 2019) — At an event in Washington, D.C., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler and Department of the Army Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works R.D. James announced that the agencies are repealing a 2015 rule that impermissibly expanded the definition of “waters of the United States” (WOTUS) under the

VIDEO: Crews use helicopter to spray field near Regina

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, nope, it’s a helicopter. Access Helicopters had a three-man crew just east of Regina on Friday, using a helicopter to apply herbicide to a canola field. “Trying to help them with their weed control on their mature canola and knock down any perennial weeds that are coming up in

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    From the Publisher

    • 360-degree cameras?

      360-degree cameras?0

      While most of you, at least in the northern hemisphere, are buckling down working through the peak of the spray season, I’m sitting here in 95°F heat in Georgia planning for a 16-day trip to Brazil and Uruguay. I’ll get a break from the heat with these countries being in their winter. But, the last

    • $1,500 a Pound?0

      I was steak shopping the other day at the local butcher shop. I noted the price of the filet mignon at a staggering $22.99 a pound. Well, at least you are not paying for the weight of the bone. In the meat tray next to the filet was very nice and inviting center cut thick

    • LATN – What is it?

      LATN – What is it?0

      LATN – What is it?  I look back on May with sadness. Two U.S. ag-operators lost their sons; one in a general aviation aircraft and the other in an Air Tractor. Ironically, this edition of AgAir Update features a father and two sons from Brazil with ag-operations and an aerobatic team. In 2015, the father

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    Hands On Flying

    • Patience0

      Patience. They say it’s a virtue, but it’s not one that many of us have in any sort of adequate quantity. We are a ‘Get there and get it done’ sort of crowd, especially when the books are getting filled and the growers are calling. Weeds are forming their own crop rotations, fungus is traversing

    • That Little Voice0

      We were flying a field that I’d never flown before. It was a good deal with a three-mile run and a low wire to hop on the north edge of the second section. There were some big, tall wires on the west edge, but they were pretty much out of the way.  Upon arriving at

    • Fertilizer challenges0

      It’s usually the thing we lead off with when the season starts; truckloads of fertilizer rolling into the airport and being staged at various remote air strips across the country.  The thing I like about dry work is it cycles quick. You’re flying a little higher, so the wires and trees are a little easier

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    In My Opinion

    • My Mistake0

      After 54 years of various type flying, navy carrier pilot, corporate pilot, ag-pilot and CFII, retired I am content to sit on my porch on the edge of the Mississippi Delta have a cold adult beverage and listen to those beautiful ag-engines (especially round engines). I thank God that I am still above ground and

    • Boo Ray and Ag Flying0

      When I was in high school and college, on weekends and sometimes during the week, we would have a friendly (usually) poker game. Often times we would play “Boo Ray.”  Boo Ray is a five-card gambling game that I am sure must have originated in south Louisiana amongst the Cajuns. It is a blood thirsty

    • Prop Arcs and Complacency0

      Many, many years ago when I was flying old Grumman S-2E Trackers off the USS Randolph then the USS Yorktown, there was a general policy that no one ever walked through the arc a propeller would make, even, of course, while the engine is not running (duh!).   In 1970, I was in the US

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