Helicopter Spreads 40,000 Pounds of Seed

MIDDLEBURY — Addison County farmers have seen a rainy and consistently wet spring and summer result in a late corn harvest. Now some of those farmers are looking to the skies again — this time for help in planting a cover crop this fall. This past Tuesday and Wednesday a crop-dusting helicopter dropped nearly 40,000

Aerial Seeding: Local Aviation and Agriculture Experts Allay Fears of Mid-Shore Citizens

EASTON — If you see a low-flying small plane dipping below the treeline, swooping low over fields and looping back up sharply to do it again — don’t panic. It’s simply aerial agriculture. Small planes applying cover crops by air during late summer are nothing new to longtime residents of Talbot County, but for the

EPA, U.S. Army Repeal 2015 Rule Defining “Waters of the United States” Ending Regulatory Patchwork

WASHINGTON (September 12, 2019) — At an event in Washington, D.C., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler and Department of the Army Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works R.D. James announced that the agencies are repealing a 2015 rule that impermissibly expanded the definition of “waters of the United States” (WOTUS) under the

VIDEO: Crews use helicopter to spray field near Regina

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, nope, it’s a helicopter. Access Helicopters had a three-man crew just east of Regina on Friday, using a helicopter to apply herbicide to a canola field. “Trying to help them with their weed control on their mature canola and knock down any perennial weeds that are coming up in

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    From the Publisher

    • Sliders — a revolution?0

      After more than forty years in the ag-aviation business, it never ceases to amaze me when a new idea becomes a reality. Of the many words that can describe ag-aviation, ingenuity would be one of those words. This month’s cover story, Sliders, is a perfect example. Just when you think that everything imaginable has been

    • Our losses2

      Sometimes you don’t realize how important somebody is to you, until you lose them. It often takes a few days to understand what has happened. Unfortunately, at least four prominent members of the SEAF associations have passed on in the last 14 months. Eddie Andrews was from a multi-generation ag-pilot/operator family. He flew ag and

    • Find your friends0

      Today, our industry is fortunate enough to have sophisticated GPS units that can track ag-aircraft in real time using the Internet. However, not all ag-aircraft have upgraded to this very valuable function. There was a time when not all ag-aircraft had a GPS unit, but that’s not true today. I believe it to be reasonable

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    Hands On Flying

    • Rock Ding!0

      As I began rolling down the runway, a little pop of dust materialized in the prop arch. Less than a blink of an eye, it was there and gone. It was an unmistakable thing. A quick signature, signing off a rock ding in the prop. Ding! Crap! I hate getting a rock ding! I’d rather

    • A long hot summer0

      It’s been a long hot summer. Hot. Just plain old hot! Density altitude has been stratospheric in most places of the country.  Runways shrink during the day, power slacks off and things just become drudgery after a while. To my knowledge, everyone adapted well to the struggle and kept it as safe as possible. I

    • Greeting the dawn0

      Dawn seeped into the valley. The new day arrived from the other side of the Sierras heralded by the silent beauty of sunrise over the mountains; magnificent array of color and promise, a brand new canvas with only the background colored in. All else left to us to fill however we see fit or are

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    In My Opinion

    • Hammerhead turns1

      We all know of some ag pilots who make hammerhead turns, and maybe you are one of those who do make these hammerhead turns. It is my contention that those ag pilots who continue to make turns like this, will one day not be able to pull out of the dive in time and the

    • Wannabe1

      This is a topic that I have touched on in a previous IMO, but I am inspired to expand and expound on the subject; and the subject is “Wannabees” ag pilots. Recently while flying in Illinois for Mr. Chuck Holzwarth, he and I briefly discussed some of what it takes to be a good ag

    • Reminiscing (Downwind Turns)0

      I was fifteen years old and had my driver’s license for three, maybe four months. It was summertime, 1955. I was a loader boy for Mr. Jimmy MacPherson (Jimmy Mac) owner of Mac’s Flying Service, a crop dusting service, not an aerial application business. We were located at Huggins Corner on Highway 82 across from

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